Art

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" el_class="blog-new-hagan" z_index=""][vc_column width="1/4"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]We are by nature, pattern recognition machines.

 

Sometimes all we need is colour and composition and we can tell exactly what something is saying.

 

A friend recently sent me this with no words, no introduction, just this, an image sitting there in my message box with no explanation. But none were needed.

 

 

Here, all we need is three colours and a general composition and we understand in an instant what it's telling us. By presenting us an abstraction, our brains naturally try to 'solve' it, this makes us invest time and feel accomplished when we figure it out. It's similar to the success of Milton Glaser's 'I Love New York' graphic. By presenting you a letter, a symbol, and an abbreviation our brains decide it's a puzzle and a puzzle that's solved in an instant. It's satisfying.

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" z_index="" el_class="blog-new-hagan"][vc_column width="1/4"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text] Early this year, in hopes of strengthening my weakness for colour, I went to the highly influential book 'Interactions of Color' by artist and educator Josef Albers.   The book, despite its heady and annoying unnecessary academic tone (which I disdain so much), instils a child-like curiosity to experiment, play, and all in all, have fun with colours.   The main takeaway from the book is how colour, much like musical notes, has a perceptible change with their combinations, like how one note on a piano would not be considered music, but play two notes, and it's a different world entirely.

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" el_class="blog-new-hagan" z_index=""][vc_column width="1/4"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]A long narrow mark which divides, directs, adds dimension, creates momentum, tension, or tranquillity, can be used to communicate everything from emotion to information, a line is an everyday tool of design and like moving girders with a crane, they should be placed with great precision and care.

[vc_row css_animation="" row_type="row" use_row_as_full_screen_section="no" type="full_width" angled_section="no" text_align="left" background_image_as_pattern="without_pattern" el_class="blog-new-hagan" z_index=""][vc_column width="1/4"][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/2"][vc_column_text]Earlier this October as the leaves were turning yellow I stepped into The RA’s distinct Matisse exhibition, ‘Matisse in the Studio’. This show was supremely interesting as it focused on Matisse’s influences and what pushed his directions and inspired his own works. You were pretty much walking into the man's art studio to snoop around.